About Me

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Writing about the things I love. My writing work has appeared in hard copy magazines including Green Prints, Twins Magazine, Practical Parenting Magazine, Good Old Days Magazine, The Journal of Court Reporting, and more as well as hundreds of articles in Sunset Hosta Farm's Hosta blog and The Homesteading Village blog.

Thursday, March 31, 2022

Monetizing Your Homestead to Market Success

Monetizing Your Homestead to Market Success

by Lance Cody-Valdez

You’ve got a homestead you can be proud of and have plenty of homemade products that you know people would be willing to buy, ranging from soap to cheese to woodcrafts and more. The only problem is getting your products out on the open market!

If you’re looking to monetize your hobby farm, look no further—this guide from The Homestead Village Blog will break down everything you need to know about monetizing your farm’s products from start to finish.

Establish Your Business

Planning to sell goods means planning to operate a business. It’s important to consider forming your business as an LLC—it reduces your personal liability and provides tax advantages. While this can be costly using the services of an attorney, you can save on cost, time, and paperwork by using a formation service online. Each state has different requirements, so be sure to check them before going forward.

Create a Brand

Firstly, you need a brand that your future customers can associate with your hobby farm. If you don’t have one already, make sure your farm has a unique name. Add some signs to the farm and any place where you think you might invite customers to do business in person.

Additionally, it’s a good idea to start an online website for your hobby farm. Make sure to register a domain name and website title that is similar to the physical name of your hobby farm.

By building a brand, you’ll ensure that no one forgets where they bought that excellent homemade chair or delicious goat cheese from, setting yourself up for future profits and success later down the road.

Marketing Your Goods

After creating an iconic brand, you'll need to market your goods so people know that they can buy from you! Marketing in this day and age is best undertaken as a mix of in-person and digital marketing.

In-person marketing can include:

  • Putting up posters in your local community

  • Putting ads in your local newspaper

  • Setting up signs on the road around your hobby farm

Digital marketing means:

  • Using digital ads, like Google Ads, to advertise to locals in your area

  • Creating a top-tier website to make it easy to order your products online

As you market your goods, be sure to emphasize:

  • What you sell and your products' prices . What makes your hobby farm unique? Is it the atmosphere, the types of products you offer, or specific aspects of your products, such as a unique flavor of food?

Collaborate with Graphic and Web Designers

As you draw up a marketing campaign for your homesteading business, it might be wise to branch into online marketing. If you make a website to sell your goods or want to come up with creative, attractive online ads, odds are you'll need to speak to a graphic designer or web designer.

Hire a graphic or web designer with a strong portfolio and examples of their prior work. That will give you an idea of whether they’ll be good for your entrepreneurial endeavor or if you should find someone else.

Once you find someone, be sure to communicate with them regularly. As you swap ideas, compress any JPG files to email important information or design ideas back and forth.

Selling Products for a Profit

As your marketing train leaves the station, you'll need to ship your products efficiently. That may mean enlisting the assistance of a shipping company to get your products to online buyers.

Alternatively, you can sell your hobby farm products in town by having a “shipping day” once per week. You can take orders all week, then load up your truck or car with all the products you sold to ship them to customers or to meet buyers in person if the customers are from your local community.

As you sell your products, be sure to keep a detailed record of each profit or loss. Good accounting is the hallmark of a steady business no matter the industry!

Be the Homesteading Hero You’ve Always Wanted

At the end of the day, selling your hobby farm products is more than possible: it’s profitable! As you reach greater success, you can take those profits and put the money back into your farm to expand their operations. Who knows? In no time at all, you might be running a bustling entrepreneurial enterprise from your backyard!


This article is brought to you by The Homestead Village Blog. Homesteading is a journey, an adventure, and an ever-evolving quest to make our homesteads more beautiful, run more efficiently, and be the haven that we've dreamed of creating for ourselves and our families. For more information, please visit my website today!

Monday, March 28, 2022

Welcome!




Welcome to 

The Homestead Village Blog


Homesteading is a journey, an adventure, and an ever-evolving quest to make our homesteads more beautiful, run more efficiently, and be the haven that we've dreamed of creating for ourselves and our families. 

Whether your homestead is deep in the country or in an urban setting, you'll find helpful articles here!


So hit that "follow" button to follow our blog and come along for the ride!



This blog is hosted by Sunset Hosta Farm


Tuesday, February 8, 2022

Reasons for Loss of Liquid in Pressure Canning




Reasons for Loss of Liquid in Pressure Canning or Siphoning



First, if you've lost liquid during the pressure canning process, you're certainly not alone, b
ut it's important to learn the reasons for liquid loss so it doesn't happen more often than you'd like.

Sunday, February 6, 2022

Signs of Spoilage in Home Canned Food




Signs of Spoilage in Home Canned Food




When preserved correctly, homemade canned foods won't go bad, ever. But realistically speaking, the food can last for at least two to five years easily without compromising on the taste or nutritional value.

Part Sun? Part Shade?

 



Part Sun?  Part Shade?

Determining Sunlight Exposure in Your Yard



Determining the sunlight exposure in your growing spaces can be less confusing if you know the reason behind the sun exposure terms used on seed packets and plant tags. 

Saturday, February 5, 2022

Fruit Prep for Making Jellies






Fruit Preparation for Making Jellies



The water bath is the simplest method for canning and is suitable for most high acid harvests, including fruit and pickled vegetables.


The following instructions are for water bath canning the follow fruits, then how to process them in five easy steps!



Enameled Dutch Oven
Click to View



How to Prepare Each Fruit


  


Apple

Wash, stem and cut into chunks. (Do not core.) Combine apples and three cups of water in a stainless steel or enameled Dutch oven. Cover and simmer for ten minutes. Crush and simmer five more minutes.



  



Berries


Wash. Crush one layer at a time with a potato masher in a stainless steel or enameled Dutch oven. Cover and bring to a simmer. Simmer five minutes.






Cherries


Dark Sweet Cherries

Remove stems. Pit and chop. Cover and bring to a simmer in a stainless steel or enameled Dutch oven with six tablespoons of water and two tablespoons of lemon juice. Simmer ten minutes.


Tart Red Cherries

Remove stems. Pit and chop. Cover and bring to a simmer in a stainless steel or enameled Dutch oven with six tablespoons of water. Simmer ten minutes.


  


Currants


Wash. Crush one layer at a time with a potato masher in a stainless steel or enameled Dutch oven. Cover and bring to a simmer with ten tablespoons of water. Simmer for ten minutes.


  


Grapes

Wash. Crush one layer at a time with a potato masher in a stainless steel or enameled Dutch oven. Cover and bring to a simmer with ten tablespoons water. Simmer ten minutes.


  


Plums


Halve, pit and finely hop. Cover and bring to a simmer with ten tablespoons water in a stainless steel or enameled Dutch oven. Simmer ten minutes.


  


Strawberries


Wash. Crush one layer at a time with a potato masher in a stainless steel or enameled Dutch oven. Cover and bring to a simmer. Simmer five minutes.


Stainless Steel Mesh Strainer
Click to View



The Five Easy Steps


Step 1

Prepare chosen fruit according to the chart above. Pour prepared fruit mixture through a wire mesh sieve lined with three layers of damp cheesecloth into a bowl.



Cheese Cloth
Click to View


Let drain two to four hours or until juice measures three cups. To avoid cloud jelly, do not press of squeeze fruit mixture.



Click to View

Step 2


Combine fruit juice and four tablespoons of Ball Classic Pectin in a large stainless steel or enameled saucepan. Bring the mixture to a rolling boil that cannot be stirred down over high heat, stirring constantly.



Click to View

Step 3


Add three and one third cups of sugar, stirring to dissolve. Return to a full rolling boil. Boil hard one minute, stirring constantly. Remove from the heat and skim the foam.


Jelly Jars
Click to View

Step 4


Ladle hot jelly into a hot jar, leaving one quarter inch headspace. Place jar in boiling water canner. Repeat until are jars are filled.
Jam and Jelly Maker
Click to View

Step 5

Process jars for ten minutes, adjusting for altitude.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Water-bath canning, also called boiling water bath, is the easier method of canning that lets you store homemade jars of jam, pickles, and tomato sauce.



So if you're canning your own home grown fruit or taking advantage of those sales, by processing your fruits, you can lock in the fresh flavor for a full year.

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Thursday, February 3, 2022

Canning Jar Sizes




Canning Jars Sizes and Their Common Usages



Mason jars have many uses, but the glass in them is particularly molded for use in home canning to preserve food. The mouths of Mason jars have threads on their outer perimeter so they can accept a metal ring when it is screwed down onto them.

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