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Friday, August 30, 2019

Hostas as Houseplants

If you’re looking for a houseplant to grace your windowsill from spring to fall, hostas are a perfect choice. They will need some winter care, which you’ll read about later.

  

Best Care Tips for Indoor Hostas



Container Size




Since hosta roots grow horizontally, for purely aesthetic reasons, the width of the pot should be greater than the height and the width should be no wider than 3” in diameter than the current root size of the hosta. 


This gives the hosta roots a chance to spread out and still nicely display the hosta's lateral and fan-shaped leaves. If you put a small hosta in too big of a pot, the hosta would be subject to root rot.




Soil


Regular potting soil amended with some peat moss for greater water retention is recommended.





Light


In general, hostas like at least two hours of sunshine with morning or afternoon sun being preferable.


A south-facing window is usually a great place for the hosta, especially in the spring when the hosta is coming out of its winter sleep. Later in the season when the sun is brighter, a move near a window with some indirect sun may be necessary.


If the tips or outside edges of the hosta leaves turn brown, or you notice dull or faded spots on the leaves, the hosta is getting too much sun where it currently is.



Water

Hostas prefer soil that is consistently moist, but not soggy. Too much water can cause crown rot. An inch of water per week is recommended. Deeply water the hosta whenever the soil feels slightly dry. Avoid getting water on the leaves if possible.


If your hosta is planted in a ceramic container, the soil will require more watering as the ceramic will absorb more water than a plastic pot.




Fertilizing


Hostas grown in containers need slightly more fertilizer than if they were planted in the ground. Nutrients that feed the plant will slowly flush out over the season as you water the soil. Adding a slow-release balanced fertilizer in the spring and once again in early summer should be all you need to keep the hosta happy and healthy through the growing season.


It is recommended that you stop fertilizing container hostas two months before your expected first frost date to help the hostas get ready for their winter dormancy.


 



Winter care

Hostas are perennials and as such they require a period of winter dormancy that is provided naturally by their usual placement outdoors. You can mimmick the period of dormancy by moving the container to a cool, dark space where temperatures remain colder than 40 degrees Fahrenheit for four to six weeks. An unheated shed or garage is perfect. The leaves may drop off during dormancy, but this is expected.


Adding a layer of shredded bark or other organic mulch will help with water retention over the winter. Water lightly once a month through the winter, just to ensure the soil does not completely dry out. 

In the spring, move the plant back to its indoor location and watch it spring back to life!


Repotting


Hosta varieties include slow growing, moderate growing and fast-growing hostas. The fast-growing varieties may need to be repotted, or up-potted, every two years to provide more room for the roots,

When it comes time to repot the hosta, just add fresh potting soil and tease the roots out and replant.

 


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With the sheer amount of beautiful hosta varieties available, it’s no wonder that so many people want to have them grace their indoor spaces as well as outdoor. Their beautiful leaves and their ease of care are only two reasons that hostas continue to be a very popular perennial.

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Related articles
Hosta 101

  

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Great hostas at affordable prices!


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